Elantra Sport Forum banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
OK, so unlike many 2.0 turbo cars out there that either require at least 91 Octane gas or "recommend" it, Hyundai says regular gas is recommended. Where I live, I can avoid ethanol additive by using 91 octane, which I've done (and want to do) for years in my current and past turbo cars.

My question is, are the 201 HP and 195 torque numbers obtained with regular (presumably 87 octane?) gas? Or with 91 or better octane gas? If the former, will running 91 octane give X% better? If the latter, what will be really get with regular gas?

I doubt there will be any 'for sure' answers, however hopefully someone will do dyno testing and be able to answer. Maybe someone already has with the Veloster or Kia Forte 1.6 turbo (assuming its the same version)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
If Hyundai is saying that it's recommended for regular gas, I would presume that the 201hp and 195 torque would be from regular 87 octane (presumably). However, based on the infinite amount of different answers you'll get online, to my knowledge... it should run exactly the same on higher octane because the computer will be adjusting itself for the higher octane and compensate to keep parameters where they should be.

That being said - I remember the new Ford Fusion Sport was boasting big power but on premium unleaded fuel 91 octane I believe. But you were able to run it with 87 and the ecu would adjust and the power would just drop down. But I don't think that Hyundai is running that adaptive fuel mapping system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. Yes I spent a bunch of time on Optima, Forte and Veloster turbo forums, and for sure there are endless answers. Two conclusions I reached. First was exactly as you said, over 87 octane is a waste and does nothing, with maybe a slight benefit if the weather is super humid and hot, and the car is under heavy load. Mind you, if the car is given a tune then for sure a higher octane would suit. Second, some have found minor benefit in how smooth it idles, and fuel mileage. Again its all unscientific as there are so many variables.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Yupp that's about it.

The tune is the only thing concrete where it's a matter of you need to run a higher octane. At that point, you can tune your car for 89, 91, 93, heck whatever you have available lol. I would really love to see how much power we can get out of a basemap tune on 93 octane.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
The only difference is that in this segment not many will be willing to fork up the extra dollars required at every fill up to get 93. Over a duration of months, a year, years, you really see how much your spending. That can be scary.

I bet tuning brands know this and will aim for reasonable gains with just regular fuel, doing that means more money in their pockets.

Now if we were say, S63 AMG owners, different story. All we would have to worry about are all the Prius owners giving us the eye.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Good luck finding an 87 octane tune, or being able to crank anything out of an 87 octane tune. Typically if you don't want to pay the prices, get a tuner that can allow you to switch back to oem base map so you can go back and forth.

Either way, if you don't have the money to spend on 91 or 93 octane fuel, I doubt you'll be interested in tuning your car for more power anyways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
I've heard that using higher octane fuel could increase your vehicle range, but not much about an increase in performance. If the car's combustion ratio wasn't meant for 92, then I guess you don't gain much by paying more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
To my knowledge you would use higher octane fuel if you were hauling something heavy or something along those lines. Not too sure on how true that is. But I don't know about it increasing your vehicle range at all though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
To my knowledge you would use higher octane fuel if you were hauling something heavy or something along those lines. Not too sure on how true that is. But I don't know about it increasing your vehicle range at all though.
Even when hauling I can't imagine fuel making that much of a difference. At the end of the day the power output can only range so much and the added benefit of a few numbers in octane won't reap any reward.

What's actually more effective with towing is moving from a stand still in a lower gear and going easy on the throttle till you have enough momentum going on.

It's all about those habits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
You definitely need to learn towing etiquette and how to go about it before you strap something on and try to haul away. I highly doubt you'll see a lot of people attempting to tow with the ES though. Not one of those cars meant for that. I wonder if they even have a towing capacity listed for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
People will tow or at least use the hitch for specific purposes like a hitch mounted rack, bike rack, small trailer, or something along that range of weight which works out to be practical for a wide range of buyers in this segment.

Just have a look at all the recreational things owners in this segment do and can do, and overall what they do and you'll find all the answers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
People definitely haul with these types of vehicles. When people say "tow" people assume car/trailer, etc. That they obviously won't do. People call tow-trucks or use pick-ups or whatever.

These vehicles however, you'll often find with a single or dual bike rack on the back of it. Or even smaller U-haul things like these or the fully covered variants of similar size.

If this old civic can do it, you bet the ES will be perfectly capable of doing it as well.

My misunderstanding of the use of "tow"

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
People definitely haul with these types of vehicles. When people say "tow" people assume car/trailer, etc. That they obviously won't do. People call tow-trucks or use pick-ups or whatever.

These vehicles however, you'll often find with a single or dual bike rack on the back of it. Or even smaller U-haul things like these or the fully covered variants of similar size.

If this old civic can do it, you bet the ES will be perfectly capable of doing it as well.

My misunderstanding of the use of "tow"

Part of me want's a hidden hitch on my Sport, then the other 87% of me says, that would look dumb as **** sticking out the back. Roof rails are no dice, don't need scratches all over the roof. My mountain bike's wheels come off easy, and it only weighs 31lb(Specialized Enduro), on the rare occasion I would want to haul it instead of just earning my descents.

I have run a full tank of 87 though it 3-4 times for the 1000km break in, and then 1/2 87 - 1/2 91, then 2-3 full 91 tanks. I went back to 87 on my last fill up, there was no noticeable change in mileage, range, or smoothness either way. Not very scientific I know, but 87 will be the juice of choice from here out. Currently in the land of the great white north, there is a $.25-30 spread between the two at any given time in my area, per litre. Easy maths.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
You have an Elantra Sport already? Where are you located exactly??

But for the regular day commuter, the science of it doesn't matter. If it isn't a noticeable difference, there's no reason for paying the extra money for premium fuel and running it when you really don't need to because you can't physically yield or see any benefits from it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
But whats more important, the functionality of having the hitch or a cleaner look? Because personally I rather sacrifice looks for the much needed functionality. Plus you can do little things to make the hitch look better, like a hitch end cover for when you don't have anything hooked up.

They help in making the setup look a bit more "original" and meant to be than without:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
You have an Elantra Sport already? Where are you located exactly??

But for the regular day commuter, the science of it doesn't matter. If it isn't a noticeable difference, there's no reason for paying the extra money for premium fuel and running it when you really don't need to because you can't physically yield or see any benefits from it.
Had it since Dec 17, 2016. One of the first, if not the first one sold and registered in BC, Canada. Quite possibly the first one in Canada/North America. I called my local dealer back in November and they got the wheels turning with Hyundai Canada, and a few weeks later they had one in for me specifically to test. Black base 6MT. Soon as I got in and fired it up, it was basically a done deal. Took it for a good 30km round trip test loop, in the first good snow we got all winter, with the stock all seasons. Traded in my 2011 Elantra GL and drove it home the following week.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
But whats more important, the functionality of having the hitch or a cleaner look? Because personally I rather sacrifice looks for the much needed functionality. Plus you can do little things to make the hitch look better, like a hitch end cover for when you don't have anything hooked up.

They help in making the setup look a bit more "original" and meant to be than without:

On this car? Honestly, the look. We are currently looking to replace the wifey's 92 Accord, so that will be our 'more practical than a sporty 4 door compact sedan' vehicle. Something like an older Tuscon/Escape/XC70/CRV/Rav4 etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
You have an Elantra Sport already? Where are you located exactly??
I was at a Hyundai dealer today in Gilbert, AZ (Phoenix suburb) and they had 1 white one, base 6MT. I really want a blue one, so they will call me when one comes in. So they are starting to make their way to dealerships now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
You have an Elantra Sport already? Where are you located exactly??

But for the regular day commuter, the science of it doesn't matter. If it isn't a noticeable difference, there's no reason for paying the extra money for premium fuel and running it when you really don't need to because you can't physically yield or see any benefits from it.
Had it since Dec 17, 2016. One of the first, if not the first one sold and registered in BC, Canada. Quite possibly the first one in Canada/North America. I called my local dealer back in November and they got the wheels turning with Hyundai Canada, and a few weeks later they had one in for me specifically to test. Black base 6MT. Soon as I got in and fired it up, it was basically a done deal. Took it for a good 30km round trip test loop, in the first good snow we got all winter, with the stock all seasons. Traded in my 2011 Elantra GL and drove it home the following week.
I live in Kamloops and I just got the white with the 6MT, I've got winters on right now but am. itching to put the AS back on.. how did. yours handle in the snow?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I live in Kamloops and I just got the white with the 6MT, I've got winters on right now but am. itching to put the AS back on.. how did. yours handle in the snow?
Just did 97c-Coquihalla from OK Falls then back to Nelson same way(through G-Forks over the Paulson) this past Sunday, you know when it started snowing again. Car is as good in the snow as any FWD with good rubber, never any issue really. I did envy the wife in her newly acquired 07 Santa Fe 3.3 AWD in some sections though..
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top