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pla·ce·bo ef·fect
pləˈsēbō əˈfekt,ēˈfekt/
noun
noun: placebo effect; plural noun: placebo effects

  1. a beneficial effect, produced by a placebo drug or treatment, that cannot be attributed to the properties of the placebo itself, and must therefore be due to the patient's belief in that treatment.








The placebo effect is strong here. Google "Strut Tower Brace Placebo". The ES has strut towers that are practically part of the firewall. And its all made of high-strength steel. None of that stuff is shifting, moving, changing position or flexing. At all. Not on street tires and street spring rates--and I would bet not in a race application either.



That said, it looks cool.
 

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However, here is some real data which shows:

It really depends on the car, and testing on each car is required to determine whether or not it would be beneficial. Your anecdotal evidence of the location of the strut towers on the ES has merit, but needs testing to confirm.

Is a Strut Brace Worth It? - Bimmerworld News, Projects & Tech


If I had large sum of money to bet, which I don't, I would bet that the results gained by the Bimmerworld crew would cross over most performance oriented cars now being made.

In the early 2000's I was involved in the Ford Focus community--I also co-designed and marketed sway bars for Gen I Foci; as such I talked to a bunch of folks who knew more than I when it came time to discuss chassis engineering. It was determined that strut bars on that platform were nothing more than something to lean on when working in the engine bay. I also remember a known performance manufacturer, who specialized in Mustangs (and Focus), said that they marketed strut tower bats for no other reason than to turn a profit.

The way cars are made now--most have the strut towers integrated into the firewall, as in the ES. That is a result of reducing NVH and add regidity to the chassis. The need for a bar is simply superfluous--even in most convertibles. The engineering these days is just that good.

To put it another way, I would be seriously disappointed if the ES benefitted in any way from a strut bar.
 

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Just taking this right from the data that the Bimmer guys came up with:

But that isn’t the comprehensive answer, and from experience, we know there is a need in some cars.


If you have some data to back up your claim, post it up. I haven't been able to find any yet, and I've tried and my google-fu is pretty strong. Not saying this to shut you down - if you have something interesting to read about this I want to read it. The more I know the better.
 

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Just taking this right from the data that the Bimmer guys came up with:

But that isn’t the comprehensive answer, and from experience, we know there is a need in some cars.


If you have some data to back up your claim, post it up. I haven't been able to find any yet, and I've tried and my google-fu is pretty strong. Not saying this to shut you down - if you have something interesting to read about this I want to read it. The more I know the better.
You won't shut me down--unless you can post evidence to say it DOES work (you already posted noting that it kind of doesn't work in a 10+ year-old BMW). There is no data that I'm aware of specifically on the new Elantra platform other than Hyundai professes it to be among the stiffest platforms in the compact market in 2017...but there is plenty on cars that share similar design elements---namely the strut towers (nearly) integral to the firewall. The fact that there are pages and pages of hits when you made the Google search should say something. The cars that will benifit are the ones where the strut towers are a distance off of the firewall--and now-a-days that's not a common engineering practice.


To imply that this bar, or ones like it, *does* work in seat-of-the -pants "testing" would also imply that the platform is lacking in rigidity and integrity at a level that can be felt on the street with street tires and a street suspension. I'm not buying it.
 

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Not saying that you're lying, bud. Not at all.

Placebo means that when you put the part on, you perceive that the car will somehow be better. You thusly have more confidence in the car and how it handles. If that makes the car faster "feeling" and you can actually drive it faster--great. That is absolutely possible--unless you're already bringing Lewis Hamilton type driving skills to the table. Having confidence in the car, especially as it approaches the limits of available grip, is very important in getting the most out of the car.

My point is that the addition of the bar, from an engineering point of view, did not really do anything significant.
 
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