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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, so I recently purchase a 18 Elentra Sport, and am wondering tips and tricks on how to drive it properly/effectively. I've watched the youtube videos on what not to do, and reviews of it, and I understand how it works. I also get it fits in between a traditional auto (with torque converter) and a manual. I have also drive a manual for a short amount of time, but am in no way a pro.



- Don't inch in traffic
- Don't inch on hills/under load


But what is the best way to drive it to effectively work? What i've noticed is that starting off is slow, like manuals, and by third gear its going good. For example, are you supposed to slam on accelerator from a complete stop, or baby it, or just normal/moderate pressure? How about when you are rolling to a stop or slowing down, or in an intersection when it turns yellow, etc. etc.?



Thanks in advance!
 

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I have found that Sport mode works best with manual shifting. The DCT seems confused at low speeds when auto shifting. But I'm normally driving faster in Sport mode. The shifts are firm and fast in Sport mode.

If coming to a stop I let it downshift itself even in manual mode. When taking off I give it a linear press and try to time full throttle with the shift into second. Since I installed the downpipe I can get some good wheel spin, which may result in wheel hop, if I'm not careful.

In Smart or Normal mode I let it shift itself. Smart seems to me to work the smoothest at low speed in auto shift.

Since I bought this for commuting, I'm generally happy with the DCT.
 

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In commute driving, it gets kind of jerky for sure when traffic gets stop n go, Sport mode helps this a lot. Something to avoid is holding the car with the gas pedal vs brakes going uphill (clutch wear). I have to time this right since I park on an upper level in the parking garage daily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for the replies....I guess my main questions, at the moment are:


1. rolling stops or rolling left/right turns...how to approach these without the hesitation occurring? Similar to manual, where you try to maintain some momentum for as long as possible?
2. starting out: ease on the gas until feel it move, or moderate pressure immediately starting out?


maybe I'm thinking too much about this. . . .
 

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To keep it from shifting in the curve, you have to roll on the throttle all the way through. The shift logic doesn't seem to take into account steering wheel angle or lateral G's, so if you let up it wants to shift.

I've had mine a year now and i'm still figuring out the take off. If the tranny is warmed up or not definitely affects the smoothness.
 

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I've had mine for about a month and it has 66000km on it (am from South Africa) seems like the gear changes are a bit rough on a cold morning in normal driving mode. Seems as if 2nd to 3rd gear the car is a bit confused and starts behaving well from 4th onwards. Generally speaking though the transmission is not bad at all, just takes a bit of getting used to
 

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Maybe just to help strengthen what others have said, I agree. The DCT has some odd behavior. I've had mine about 2 years (this June) and I still don't always get what it wants to do. I've had some odd times where I've kinda stalled out in the middle of intersections when heavy traffic was coming (I don't live too far from Denver) and letting off and then flooring it is the best way to get out of that scary situation which sucks but can be avoided as best as possible. When in a situation where you know you'll need the car to do what you want, as others have said Sport mode and manual shifting are always best for control. The car's built-in logic definitely has some issues and a lot of things to calculate with 7 gears and trying to get the best mix of performance, fuel economy, low emissions output, etc... Something else to note, it seems to me that some of my engine mods have helped improve issues a tiny bit. I can't explain why but one item that seems to have helped my car in a few unexpected ways is the Velossa Tech intake scoop (I'm gonna sound like I'm a promoter for them if you read my other posts but I'm not). My only thinking is that the engine suffers a bit of turbo lag/load issues when the DCT shifts (change in RPMs) and the scoop pushing in air helps the turbo recover faster. This is my first turbo car and I wonder if it causes some issues with the DCTs logic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Maybe just to help strengthen what others have said, I agree. The DCT has some odd behavior. I've had mine about 2 years (this June) and I still don't always get what it wants to do. I've had some odd times where I've kinda stalled out in the middle of intersections when heavy traffic was coming (I don't live too far from Denver) and letting off and then flooring it is the best way to get out of that scary situation which sucks but can be avoided as best as possible. When in a situation where you know you'll need the car to do what you want, as others have said Sport mode and manual shifting are always best for control. The car's built-in logic definitely has some issues and a lot of things to calculate with 7 gears and trying to get the best mix of performance, fuel economy, low emissions output, etc... Something else to note, it seems to me that some of my engine mods have helped improve issues a tiny bit. I can't explain why but one item that seems to have helped my car in a few unexpected ways is the Velossa Tech intake scoop (I'm gonna sound like I'm a promoter for them if you read my other posts but I'm not). My only thinking is that the engine suffers a bit of turbo lag/load issues when the DCT shifts (change in RPMs) and the scoop pushing in air helps the turbo recover faster. This is my first turbo car and I wonder if it causes some issues with the DCTs logic.

But, what you're describe about the middle of an intersection, isn't that the same for a manual? When I had the veloster with the TC, this wasn't a problem, and I could always make these 'quick' moves. But can you really get in 1st that quickly in a manual and still make those quick moves? Isn't there still a lag when the clutch is slipping to engaged VS automatic?
 

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Not 100% sure why you started talking and asking about a manual trans..? The situation I described for the middle of an intersection could happen in a manual if the person isn't properly getting out of the clutch or isn't in the right gear, but it would come down to driver error. The situation I describe could be similar, but it's the car's logic programmed into the TCU that's messing up the situation. As I said in my post, the chance of an error can be greatly reduced in Sport mode, and that's because of how the programming changes controlling the 2 clutches, downshifting/upshifting, how long gears are held, shift points, and I'm sure more... I can drive the car in manual mode and I definitely make better shifting decisions than the car would in my opinion, but I hate controlling the shift from a paddle shifter that rotates with the steering wheel. I'm not exactly sure how the car was able to rebound so quickly when the intersection thing has happened. I think the flooring it makes the car react quickly. The dual clutch allows one gear to be selected while another is applied, so that might be what's happening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Not 100% sure why you started talking and asking about a manual trans..? The situation I described for the middle of an intersection could happen in a manual if the person isn't properly getting out of the clutch or isn't in the right gear, but it would come down to driver error. The situation I describe could be similar, but it's the car's logic programmed into the TCU that's messing up the situation. As I said in my post, the chance of an error can be greatly reduced in Sport mode, and that's because of how the programming changes controlling the 2 clutches, downshifting/upshifting, how long gears are held, shift points, and I'm sure more... I can drive the car in manual mode and I definitely make better shifting decisions than the car would in my opinion, but I hate controlling the shift from a paddle shifter that rotates with the steering wheel. I'm not exactly sure how the car was able to rebound so quickly when the intersection thing has happened. I think the flooring it makes the car react quickly. The dual clutch allows one gear to be selected while another is applied, so that might be what's happening.

I brought a manual trans into the conversation because our transmission is more similar to a manual than an automatic with TC, no? Manual transmissions aren't as fast at shifting out of first compared to an auto with torque converter, correct? so my point was that a manual trans and a DCT are basically in the same boat as far as slower to get into gear initially from a stop vs an auto trans w/ TC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
after a little bit of time with it, i realized you need to start out slower. I tried giving higher than moderate pressure on a slight incline, and the car 'banged'. probably the trans, but not sure if the tires just caught and that caused it, but didn't sound good, if this helps anyone
 

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@estar13 Have you tried launch control yet? It's a lot of fun. The manuals don't get it unless they pay for it with tune. You just hold down on the brake pedal with left foot and mash the gas with the right foot. When RPMs build to about 1800 (it'll hold for about 2 seconds) just let off the brake pedal and launch away. Better engine mounts, struts, control arm bushings, tires, etc will help with wheel hop if you experience any. I believe most are saying that the control arm bushings are the biggest contributor.
As someone else said, this car does respond well to kinda "rolling" your foot into the pedal when accelerating.
 

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@estar13 Have you tried launch control yet? It's a lot of fun. The manuals don't get it unless they pay for it with tune. You just hold down on the brake pedal with left foot and mash the gas with the right foot. When RPMs build to about 1800 (it'll hold for about 2 seconds) just let off the brake pedal and launch away. Better engine mounts, struts, control arm bushings, tires, etc will help with wheel hop if you experience any. I believe most are saying that the control arm bushings are the biggest contributor.
As someone else said, this car does respond well to kinda "rolling" your foot into the pedal when accelerating.
The car does not have an official launch control, and I would highly advise doing what you are doing with it. Unless you want to replace a transmission. ;)
 

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@estar13 Have you tried launch control yet? It's a lot of fun. The manuals don't get it unless they pay for it with tune. You just hold down on the brake pedal with left foot and mash the gas with the right foot. When RPMs build to about 1800 (it'll hold for about 2 seconds) just let off the brake pedal and launch away. Better engine mounts, struts, control arm bushings, tires, etc will help with wheel hop if you experience any. I believe most are saying that the control arm bushings are the biggest contributor.
As someone else said, this car does respond well to kinda "rolling" your foot into the pedal when accelerating.
This is basically a "neutral drop", and a great way to destroy your transmission.
 

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This guy says he contacted Hyundai and that's the procedure they gave him. He shows how to do it in this video and it works exactly as described on the ES.


 

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Do you have anything to back that up? How did you reach that conclusion? You don't have a DCT... No literature, video, or any kind of explanation given to back up your claim. The DCT version of the ES has launch control, official, or not. It works exactly as launch control does in other makes and models of vehicles with DCTs/DSGs. You really love to hijack threads you don't belong in. I came to spread helpful information, but keep getting followed behind by someone who just wants to hear themselves talk. I would take anything R1600Turbo says with a bucket of salt.
 

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Do you have anything to back that up? How did you reach that conclusion? You don't have a DCT... No literature, video, or any kind of explanation given to back up your claim. The DCT version of the ES has launch control, official, or not. It works exactly as launch control does in other makes and models of vehicles with DCTs/DSGs. You really love to hijack threads you don't belong in. I came to spread helpful information, but keep getting followed behind by someone who just wants to hear themselves talk. I would take anything R1600Turbo says with a bucket of salt.
I've had my car since they first hit dealers three years ago. I have many hours into modifying and driving mine, I've seen what works and what doesn't. I have far more experience with them than you. Hyundai does not advertise the car as having launch control, it's not on a features list, and there is zero mention of it in the owners manual. Just because you can do that little trick to launch the car, doesn't mean it has "launch control".

This is a public forum. I will post where I want. Thank you for your concerns.
 

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TLDR; service advisor/tech said it’s fine to use this built-in programming as a launch control and I have lots of evidence comparing the “feature” to launch control.

So far no one has provided any evidence to support their claims that this programmed feature isn’t a form of launch control, whether it’s official or not. You can also have the most knowledge about the car of anyone, but if you don’t drive the DCT, it’d be really hard to know how it operates. In response to the claim this is like a neutral drop—if it’s like anything, it’d be like a clutch drop in an MT, but it’s under control like launch control. I have never and will never neutral drop my ES.

The following info is so that people can make their own decision on this little debate. It concerns me how many threads I’ve seen where ideas, thoughts, wants, etc. get shot down by others who don’t support their claims. Some of these people have been proven wrong several times in other threads and never own up to it. The following is lengthy but it all supports my stance.

In the video already provided in another post the pertinent information starts at 5:54. The guy literally starts the segment by saying, “…this brings us to our final point, which is about launching your dual clutch vehicle.” He also claims to have contacted Hyundai about it. He then uses the method given to launch the Tucson he’s driving (1.6T, DCT).

In the video, the guy gives a little disclaimer about launching, but the ES has built-in warning messages about DCT overheating. I’ve never seen one of those messages on my dash. I’ve probably launched my ES over 50 times using the exact method described in the video. Since I learned how to launch the car and have done all of those launches, I’ve seen no change in performance with my transmission (unless an aftermarket part changed driving characteristics).

So why would Hyundai program in the feature if it would just ruin the transmission to use it? There are other vehicles programmed to ignore inputs from the throttle if you’re trying to apply the brake and accelerator at the same time. I’ve even been in vehicles that wouldn’t let you rev in P without initiating programming to allow it.

Here’s a website that describes how launch control works.
https://www.carthrottle.com/post/heres-how-launch-control-works/
From the website: “In the majority of cars, one has to engage a specific driver mode within the traction control settings to initiate launch control. Once the setting has been selected, the brake needs to be held down for a given time before the throttle can be floored. The rev counter then hits a predetermined limit, creating a spine-tingling rasp emanating from the exhaust. Then it’s up to you to step off the brake from which point the throttle is specifically applied to allow for the least amount of wheel spin and maximum acceleration.”

In the ES, no mode is selected. You push down the brake and floor it, as stated. A predetermined and programmed RPM limit of about 17-1800 RPMs is hit. Step off the brake, and the car launches with minimum wheel spin (it spins them, but it’s no AT neutral drop) and maximum acceleration. You’re going to get the best 0-60 times using this method.

Also, from the site, “This limit has been calculated by the engineers who programmed the ECU, finding the maximum torque output through to the wheels that will make for the fastest acceleration.”

The ES makes the most torque from 1500-4500 RPMs on stock tune. The preset RPM is just over 1500 and is enough to get the turbo to start spooling.

“It needs to eliminate wheel spin and hop, maximize useable power, weight transfer and traction and – in forced-induction powertrains – it has to build boost to a required level.”
And finally, “Dual-clutch transmissions are the norm when it comes to launch control systems…”

Here’s another website asking why launch control exists on any car. https://www.thedrive.com/sheetmetal/11324/whats-the-point-of-launch-control
They conjecture that it’s only to improve 0-60 times that manufacturers can report. Kind of odd, though, that Hyundai never officially reported those times for ES models, and they never officially called this feature launch control on any 7-speed DCT vehicles… Still programmed in there though, no trickery.

There are also my thoughts that a vehicle with an official launch control feature probably has higher insurance premiums. It’s known that certain features on a car can increase the rates because it increases the likelihood that it’ll be driven more aggressively. The ironic thing is that launch control should improve characteristics of a launch and minimize issues such as wheel spin. However, a vehicle with official launch control is likely to have that feature be used/abused much more often.

Lastly, the icing on my layer cake. I’ve had my car in for the clunking noise when turning right (upper passenger motor mount), and I asked the service advisor (Del at Crossroads Hyundai) his thoughts on the matter. He said he had never heard of what I had described and offered to talk to a tech about. I said that would be great. He came back with a big smile on his face and said it was a part of the DCT programming. He said the tech (Brad) said that on the SUVs it’s kinda like engaging a direct drive feature and allows them advantages in certain scenarios, especially since they’re AWD. He said it has the side effect of being like launch control on the cars that had the same transmission. He kinda make a comment about probably not mentioning it to all the soccer moms or we’d start seeing a lot of launches from lights/signs and then he went off to tell some sales guys. I launched my car a couple times on the drive home and had a good day.

Happy launching to those with DCTs who decide to try it. I’ll be out there launching mine.
 
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