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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anybody had additional sound deadening installed in their ES? I am looking to reduce road noise and increase audio clarity in my ES. Wondering it is truly worth it. I have come across a lot of very positive claims for aftermarket sound deadening.
 

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I haven't yet - just picked up my gray DCT Sunday - but I did fairly extensive sound treatments to my 2006 Sonata with great results. Well worth it.

I plan to do a complete strip down of the interior, headliner, and trunk to the new ES, and do a full CLD (AKA Dynamat) and mass loaded vinyl treatment to it, but probably won't be able to get to it for a couple of months. This will also entail a complete replacement of the stock sound system. I would rate the current noise levels as decent for a new, fairly inexpensive, sporty car, but I want it much more quiet, as the noise levels are noticeably higher than my Sonata.
 

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I was one the first ones to add sound deadening mats to the trunk and door panels. It will not decrease road noise. You will need to switch from stock tires.
What it does help is with sound quality of your stereo.
 

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If you do enough deadening - this is where a complete MLV install comes into play, as opposed to Dynamat-type dampeners - it will lower road noise, but different tires will have a greater effect. To varying degrees, sound treatments and different tires will each improve noise, but both together will do even better. I'm probably going to stick with the stock tires until they wear out; at that time, I'll be looking to switch to a tire with better noise characteristics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you do enough deadening - this is where a complete MLV install comes into play, as opposed to Dynamat-type dampeners - it will lower road noise, but different tires will have a greater effect. To varying degrees, sound treatments and different tires will each improve noise, but both together will do even better. I'm probably going to stick with the stock tires until they wear out; at that time, I'll be looking to switch to a tire with better noise characteristics.
What does MLV mean? Sorry if this is an obvious question.
 

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What does MLV mean? Sorry if this is an obvious question.
Mass Loaded Vinyl. Weighs 1 pound per square foot. Constrained layer damping (aka Dynamat and other brands) controls resonances, but doesn't do much to kill road noise. It keeps the metal panels of the car from ringing and adding their own sound. Decoupled MLV forms a barrier to sound. The downside is that it is heavy. Full treatment - covering basically the entire inside of the car below the widows, including the trunk - for a car like the ES will add 100+ pounds of weight. It's too heavy to attach to the roof of the car, but can be attached pretty much everywhere else.

As solo_gen pointed out, tires will play the biggest role in road noise. MLV is the other way to reduce the noise. For maximum benefit, you'll want to address both.

This is a good site for describing the different materials for car sound treatments:

https://www.sounddeadenershowdown.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What does MLV mean? Sorry if this is an obvious question.
Mass Loaded Vinyl. Weighs 1 pound per square foot. Constrained layer damping (aka Dynamat and other brands) controls resonances, but doesn't do much to kill road noise. It keeps the metal panels of the car from ringing and adding their own sound. Decoupled MLV forms a barrier to sound. The downside is that it is heavy. Full treatment - covering basically the entire inside of the car below the widows, including the trunk - for a car like the ES will add 100+ pounds of weight. It's too heavy to attach to the roof of the car, but can be attached pretty much everywhere else.

As solo_gen pointed out, tires will play the biggest role in road noise. MLV is the other way to reduce the noise. For maximum benefit, you'll want to address both.

This is a good site for describing the different materials for car sound treatments:

https://www.sounddeadenershowdown.com/
Thanks for the great info!
 

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There are many types of materials that can be used to reduce unwanted sound in the car. Dynamat type material is the most common. Others, like thinsulate are also pretty effective. It depends on the frequency range you are trying to reduce.
 

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At this point I've only got rid of the stock tires and added two layers of FatMat (about 6 lbs.) to the spare tire wheel well (the factory put zero sound deadening there!). Beyond that, everything is difficult to do, time consuming (or very expensive if you have someone do it, if you can even find someone) and adds too much weight. The car is definitely better than stock, mainly because of the tires reducing road noise, but it doesn't change the general way the car is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
At this point I've only got rid of the stock tires and added two layers of FatMat (about 6 lbs.) to the spare tire wheel well (the factory put zero sound deadening there!). Beyond that, everything is difficult to do, time consuming (or very expensive if you have someone do it, if you can even find someone) and adds too much weight. The car is definitely better than stock, mainly because of the tires reducing road noise, but it doesn't change the general way the car is.
What tires did you go with? That might be a simple solution for me. Did you stick with 18" wheels or drop down to 17"?
 

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What tires did you go with? That might be a simple solution for me. Did you stick with 18" wheels or drop down to 17"?
I really wanted to go with 17's and also change from an "all-season ultra high performance" tire to "all-season grand touring". However the $ started to add up with the alloys and all, and I realized it might hurt the car's trade in value. That's important to me as I'm not sure I'm keeping this car long term, even though I still think its the best bank for buck out there.

Instead I found a tire shop that would take my original tires on trade, and went with the same category tire and same size, but one that research said was better with road noise and also had better performance in most categories - dry, wet, snow (reference Tire Rack Reader Surveys). Our size is not available in quite a few of the well known brands. I ended up getting Dunlop Signature HP. I don't know yet if the performance is better, but have no complaints and the tread pattern appears more aggressive. Road noise has reduced, I could tell immediately, and that was enough to make me happy with what I call an "upscale option".

Here are some links from my research. None are winter tires;

Dunlop Signature HP
Tire Review;
https://tirereviewsandmore.com/dunlop-signature-hp-reviews/
Tire Rack Reader Survey - note where the Dunlop Signature and Hankook are;
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/surveyresults/surveydisplay.jsp?type=UHPAS&

If 17" Grand touring;
This was the tire I wanted, very reasonably priced and good reviews;
https://tirereviewsandmore.com/kumho-solus-ta71-reviews/
Tire Rack Survey for Grand Touring all-Season (difficult to find our size, and the corresponding 17's too);
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/surveyresults/surveydisplay.jsp?type=GTAS&
 
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